Friday, 19 October 2012

3 Ways to Make Right Angle Weave Spectacular



If you haven’t tried Right Angle Weave yet than don’t be deterred: the stitch is really not that hard, and as I have already discovered is as simple as doing the dosado.
One of the great things about right angle weave is the diversity of the stitch, the possibilities are endless. But for those needing a place to start, here are three simple methods you can utilise to expand on the basic stitch.

First: Colour

I know this may seem obvious, but the basic template of the right angle weave stitch is a great asset for creating unusual patterns of colour. Of course you can create pretty much any pattern you like- see right angle weave patterns for a fantastic turtle, butterfly and peacock pattern. But even the simplest strategic placement of colour can create something quite unique. When choosing your colour scheme think about what aspects of the pattern you want to highlight. Perhaps you want to accentuate the diagonals, or maybe you want to create crosses, perhaps it is the vertical, or horizontal axis. Be creative, explore and experiment with colour - its not like your painting the walls in your house. You can always start again!




Second: Create different unit dimensions

My tutorial on right angle weave I explain how to stitch a basic pattern based upon 1 x 1 units. One of my favorite ways to expand on right angle weave is to create a pattern with differing dimensions of height to width. The right angle weave bracelet is an example of right angle weave utilising 3 x 3 units (forming squares). Basically, this is once again just a matter of trial and error. Here is a pattern for 1 x 3 units. Note, the red beads are larger than the pink; this of course is another way to achieve a different effect. You could even exchange the three side pink beads for bugle beads. Play around with different bead sizes and different dimensions.





Third: Create more than one variation of unit dimension

Okay so I’ve already discussed the possibility of creating different unit dimensions. Now, expanding on this idea, you can alternate different unit dimensions between each row, or each new unit you stitch. This is a great way to come up with some very spectacular, not to mention, complex looking designs.

To stitch the pattern below follow the sequence:
The first row: 1 x 1 unit, 1 x 2 unit (repeat).
The second row:  2 x 1 unit, 2 x 2 unit (repeat).
The third row: 1x1 unit, 1 x 2 unit (repeat).
Note that the first and third row are the same.




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